chibird:

Sometimes you just have to work on one at a time, and build your way up to a steady balance. Be strong!

chibird:

Sometimes you just have to work on one at a time, and build your way up to a steady balance. Be strong!

POSTED September 17, 2014 @ 14:30 WITH 2,909 notes
REBLOGGED FROM: chibird

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the-future-mrs-cumberbatch:

you know what I want.?
Twelve is so against all Kind of physical interaction and it’s really cute and funny and all, but what I really want is him, only once, hugging clara. She would be so surprised and confused and twelve would be all like “look clara I am doing this for you, I hate hugging but I love you so I love hugging you ok”.

theasinineouroboros:

alltheselittlevoices:

haleepls:

hold-a-lover-close:

owlturdcomix:

We go forward.

This is too deep to comprehend.

Stop it

I THOUGHT THIS WAS GOING TO BE FUNNY

WHAT THE FUCK WHAT IS YOUR FUCKING PROBLEM NOOO THAT IS NOT OKAY

It’s a gutsy move to actually go back to the Doctor’s childhood; the decision to keep the young Gallifreyan in silhouette, with only his hair and feet even briefly visible, is an acknowledgment that the episode risks compromising one of the show’s great enduring mysteries. But then, Steven Moffat has been quietly building to this scene for almost a decade; think of the 9th Doctor in “The Empty Child” saying he knows what it’s like to be left out in the cold, or of Reinette seeing the 10th Doctor’s lonely childhood in “The Girl In The Fireplace.” The Doctor didn’t run away from Gallifrey because he fitted in perfectly, after all, and this night—one of many, apparently—spent cowering in fear is just the beginning of the journey that led him to discover courage. After all, courage would be unnecessary in the absence of fear, and kindness cannot easily exist without either of them.


At its heart, “Listen” is an act of compassion toward the Doctor. Previous episodes have examined and analyzed the Doctor’s foibles, shining the spotlight on the flaws in his character that make him so much more fascinating than some boring old hero. But what far fewer stories have done is seek to understand the Doctor. It’s easy to sympathize with the Doctor when he’s being a bit of a bastard, but that’s generally a question of balancing the scales: Yes, the Doctor is in the wrong in this given situation, but he’s so often in the right that he can be cut some slack. But it’s far harder to empathize with the Doctor, because that requires us to understand the Doctor as just another person. Russell T. Davies, for all his success bringing out the emotional realities of the companions’ lives, had a tendency to keep the Doctor at arm’s length, relying on Christopher Eccleston’s and David Tennant’s acting to bring out otherwise unspoken emotions. Steven Moffat is more interested in exploring the Doctor, but generally in terms of his unique status as the universe’s greatest legend. Here, however, a particularly alien Doctor is revealed to be driven, at least in part, by the fears and dreams that haunted him eons ago. That’s not everything we need to know about the Doctor, for no one can be so easily reduced. But “Listen” is just about the most honest exploration of the Doctor we’ve seen in 51 years. That it does all this without judgment, but rather with love and understanding, is what makes it special. It’s what makes it Doctor Who.

minato-yuki:

OOOH MY GOODNESS LOOK AT THE LONG BUN SNUGGLING KITTY OH MY GOODNES BUN FTTY BABY

minato-yuki:

OOOH MY GOODNESS LOOK AT THE LONG BUN SNUGGLING KITTY OH MY GOODNES BUN FTTY BABY

mishcollin:

i love that fall has a feeling, it’s not even the taste of smoke and barbeque in the air or the smell of wet dead leaves, it’s like a palpable feeling against your skin. it reminds me of renaissance festivals and cider barns and long highway drives to lawrence with the trees all sunset-shaded on the side of the road and cold night bonfires and guys i really fucking love autumn

fall
theme